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ARCHatlas

Bringing Architecture, Design and Art to your Dash.



archatlas:

House Inside a Rock 

In the development of the ‘House Inside a Rock,’ Amey Kandalgaonkar took influence from the rock-cut tomb architecture of Saudi Arabia’s Madain Saleh. This ancient archaeological site expresses classical facades carved into a mass of sandstone, rationalizing the organic geometry. The Shanghai-based architect develops a more contemporary reading through an investigation of this subtractive method, introducing a second material to cut through the original rock. Rather than through a flattening of the organic surface, the formal dichotomy is generated with the insertion of clean concrete slabs.

Posted: May 23, 2019, 2:33 am


House Inside a Rock 

In the development of the ‘House Inside a Rock,’ Amey Kandalgaonkar took influence from the rock-cut tomb architecture of Saudi Arabia’s Madain Saleh. This ancient archaeological site expresses classical facades carved into a mass of sandstone, rationalizing the organic geometry. The Shanghai-based architect develops a more contemporary reading through an investigation of this subtractive method, introducing a second material to cut through the original rock. Rather than through a flattening of the organic surface, the formal dichotomy is generated with the insertion of clean concrete slabs.

Posted: May 22, 2019, 9:05 pm


lestni_ca

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Posted: May 17, 2019, 5:14 pm
les halles, paris by analoglens:

© timo bernhard, all rights reserved

Posted: May 17, 2019, 1:17 pm


Le MétaHisme : La Conscience De L'Invisible (Transcription)

The MetaHism is an artistic movement that expresses and embodies the human mind as a meta-paradigm. This Art of the Consciousness, connects a global perception of the visible and invisible events simultaneously. META, because expressing the Whole, ISM as the concept and universal suffix, which we find in all the movements and H, eight letter of the alphabet, (letter of the infinity, ∞, lemniscate) separating and unifying.

©PatrickLaumond - Photo P.Tapissier - Paris, 2019
www.laumond.com

Posted: May 17, 2019, 12:47 pm

Non existent. I trim it every couple of weeks and wash it when i shower… that is about it.

Posted: May 17, 2019, 12:46 pm


archatlas:

Outstanding Concert Halls: A Perfect Match Between Acoustics and Aesthetics

When we think about a perfect match between acoustics and good design it may not be as easy as it seems. A number of technical decisions in order to make an interior space acoustically efficient -and to achieve its programmatic purpose correctly- can make some of the architect’s design intentions fade and be replaced by standard and prefabricated panels.

In this article published in Archdaily, they present a selection of architecture projects that are able to create a memorable visual impact as well as an impeccable interior solution for acoustics.

Posted: May 16, 2019, 12:47 pm


Outstanding Concert Halls: A Perfect Match Between Acoustics and Aesthetics

When we think about a perfect match between acoustics and good design it may not be as easy as it seems. A number of technical decisions in order to make an interior space acoustically efficient -and to achieve its programmatic purpose correctly- can make some of the architect’s design intentions fade and be replaced by standard and prefabricated panels.

In this article published in Archdaily, they present a selection of architecture projects that are able to create a memorable visual impact as well as an impeccable interior solution for acoustics.

Posted: May 15, 2019, 3:34 pm


Zhongshuge Bookstore 

Zhongshuge Bookstore in Chongqing city has an interior that’s the stuff of fantasy tales. Designed by architecture firm X+Living, the location—dubbed one of the most beautiful bookstores in China—is a mirrored maze that might make any visitor feel humbled by a world of stories spanning cultures and eras.


Posted: May 11, 2019, 7:56 pm


Ramzy Masri aka space.ram

Posted: May 7, 2019, 7:29 pm


Artisanal

“Artisanal” is a word one hears a lot these days, especially in Brooklyn. Consumers are getting tired of the same old same old and long for one-of-a-kind products, preferably those made by hand. Artisans themselves are looking to escape a mainstream workforce where workers rarely get to take ownership over their own projects. The architecture student Joanne Chen seized on this trend in an imaginative manner, designing a factory where master craftsmen could work alongside one another. 

Chen’s project was completed as part of her Masters program at the Bartlett School of Architecture in London. She worked in collaboration with the architect Niall McLaughlin as well as Michiko Sumi and Yeoryia Manolopoulou.

Posted: May 5, 2019, 11:43 pm
Witness the future of architecture at Pratt Shows 2019:

Going on now through mid-May at various locations across Brooklyn and Manhattan, Pratt Shows features public presentations and exhibitions from Pratt’s School of Architecture. These events showcase work from undergraduate and graduate talent touching on the topics of social impact practice, community design, urban placemaking, and more.

Pratt Shows is the institute-wide celebration of work by Pratt Institute’s graduating class. These exhibitions and presentations advance new ideas in architecture, art, design, information, and the liberal arts and sciences.

Posted: May 1, 2019, 4:37 pm
Jakarta: the fastest-sinking city in the world:

It sits on swampy land, the Java Sea lapping against it, and 13 rivers running through it. So it shouldn’t be a surprise that flooding is frequent in Jakarta and, according to experts, it is getting worse. But it’s not just about freak floods, this massive city is literally disappearing into the ground.

The dramatic rate at which Jakarta is sinking is partly down to the excessive extraction of groundwater for use as drinking water, for bathing and other everyday purposes by city dwellers. Piped water isn’t reliable or available in most areas so people have no choice but to resort to pumping water from the aquifers deep underground.

Posted: May 1, 2019, 4:33 pm


Jewel Changi Airport Safdie Architects 

Jewel Changi Airport re-imagines the center of an airport as a major public realm attraction. Jewel offers a range of facilities for landside airport operations, indoor gardens and leisure attractions, retail offerings and hotel facilities, all under one roof. A distinctive dome-shaped façade made of glass and steel adds to Changi Airport’s appeal as one of the world’s leading air hubs. (Text via Safdie Architects)

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Posted: April 28, 2019, 8:33 pm


Banca Popolare Detail

Photograph captured by Stephen Daly of a stone detail on the facade of Banca Popolare in Verona by Carlo Scarpa.

Posted: April 28, 2019, 8:15 pm


Taj Mahal Siroj Ho’janazarov

Posted: April 24, 2019, 3:30 pm

I don’t think I would qualify them as “opposites.” IN MY OPINION, their philosophy and work reflect two branches of the Modernism tree.  Both of them are a reflection of their time and based their designs on exploring the relationship between form and function. Both of them used new and innovative technologies of construction while creating works that challenged expectations regarding previous architectural styles. 

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Mies taught us about ornamentation through revealing the order and materials in architecture. His work still stands because of his attention to detail and space while seeking out to use steel and glass to create a new architecture. Wright taught us about what he called “organic architecture.” His work stands because of his attention to creating architecture using affordable materials that was unique to a setting.

This might be a very simplistic explanation but the question to be fully answered would require a whole book.

Posted: April 24, 2019, 3:06 pm

 

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