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Traditional Persian Rugs As Canvas To Spray-Paint Female Portraits by Mateo

Statement by the artist Mateo:

“I’ve been painting in the streets for 12 years. In 2015, during a residency in Barcelona, I started using the traditional Azulejos ceramic design that we often see in Spain, Portugal, and Maghreb in my work. I started including these colored patterns in my murals, and it became my trademark as a street artist. This led me to great interest and study of traditional crafts of different cultures around the world and their symbols. I searched for a way to link traditional arts and crafts to my paintings and urban art.

Carpets are one of the most ancient, visually rich, and meaningful traditional arts that can be found. They are traditionally weaved by women, which is why I chose to represent women’s portraits on them.”

Text via BoredPanda

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Posted: September 18, 2020, 1:10 pm


Frank Gehry’s Eisenhower Memorial Opens in Washington, D.C.

The $150 million memorial—designed by Frank Gehry, who was selected in a 2009 competition—is finally opening, but it took more than twice as long to complete as it took to win the war. 

On an unpromising four-acre site, south of the National Mall in Washington—jammed with parked cars and facing the back side of the National Air and Space Museum—Gehry proposed an immense, translucent metal tapestry, to mask the stolid 1961 U.S. Department of Education building behind it. 

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On a plaza in front would be components celebrating Ike as both the supreme commander of the Allies and as the 34th President of the United States. But the design—and Gehry himself—came under fierce attack from several quarters, including the Eisen­hower grandchildren, and from a little-known, conservative critic named Justin Shubow (Shubow went on to find favor in the current White House and reportedly was behind a proposed executive order to mandate a “classical style” for new Federal buildings). At one point, Congress was so swayed by the naysayers that the House canceled the memorial’s appropriation.

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Posted: September 17, 2020, 12:30 am
A study that compared 1930s maps with modern health data found greater COVID-19 risk factors in historically “redlined” neighborhoods.:

For decades, starting at least in the 1930s, low-income and minority communities were intentionally cut off from lending and investment through a system known as redlining.

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Today, those same neighborhoods suffer not only from reduced wealth and greater poverty, but from lower life expectancy and higher incidence of chronic diseases that are risk factors for poor outcomes from COVID-19.

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Housing, economic and social policies should aim to eliminate those risks and undo the unfair burdens of structural racism, both past and present.

Posted: September 15, 2020, 7:21 pm


Niemeyer and Beyond: A Guide to Modernist Brazilian Architecture

An end of an era came in December 2012 when Oscar Niemeyer passed away. Niemeyer was not the only modernist architect working in Brazil, which is full of elegant, imaginative buildings from other home-grown masters. Following our recent dig into Mexican modernism, we now turn to look at Niemeyer’s work, as well as some of Brazil’s lesser-known modernists.

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Posted: September 14, 2020, 5:45 pm
The Life and Death of the Tiny Home Trend:

While the idea is that small living can offer more freedom, flexibility, and an emphasis on experiences over personal items, this lifestyle only attracts a certain niche of the population, who data shows isn’t actually capitalizing on it, and isn’t taking on the nomadic and minimalist lifestyle en masse.

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Tiny homes are also not cheap to build- in fact, in the United States, tiny homes often cost more per square foot than standard size homes, in part because larger construction jobs more efficiently use resources. The average 2,000-square foot home costs only $150 to build, according to HomeAdvisor, whereas tiny homes constructed by one of the most popular builders in America, Tumbleweed Tiny House Company, typically cost more than double that per square foot.

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Posted: September 14, 2020, 1:02 pm


Phoenix Central Park Gallery John Wardle Architects + Durbach Block Jaggers 

The vision of remarkable arts philanthropist Judith Neilson, the building is a partnership of architecture and artistic fields. The intention is to have the spaces working together, to have visual arts interwoven with the performing arts. 

Two architects bring the design together: John Wardle Architects designed the gallery in the east wing and Durbach Block Jaggers designed the performance space. The components are linked centrally by a courtyard and garden. 

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Posted: September 11, 2020, 1:25 pm


The World’s Longest Glass-Bottom Bridge Stretches Across the Lianjiang River in China

Extending 526.14 meters, a new glass-bottom bridge in China’s Huangchuan Three Gorges Scenic Area now ranks as the longest in the world. 

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The lengthy structure is the project of the firm Architectural Design & Research Institute of Zhejiang University and looms 201 meters above the Lianjiang River. Bright red towers mark either end, with an 8.8-meter-wide deck running between them.

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Three layers of 4.5-centimeter-thick glass lined with steel compose the transparent bridge, which is suspended with cables and can hold 500 people. According to Dezeen, the previous record-holder was a wobbly 488-meter structure in China’s Hebei province.

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Posted: September 9, 2020, 5:30 pm


Alessio Forlano 

Alessio Forlano is the man behind these black and white architecture photos. What makes his work unique is the fact he photographs buildings that look normal for the naked eye.

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He does this by showing people from all around the world his unbelievable black and white architecture photos. There are a lot of photographs out there that express how beautiful infrastructure can be in many cases.

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These photos mostly are important because they portray something that stands tall right in front of us on a daily basis. Although when it comes to truly seeing the artistic perspective of a structure, in most cases we are prone to become blind and never appreciate it.

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Posted: September 9, 2020, 12:51 am


Onagawan Hinterland, Japan 2016 by James Alder

Posted: September 9, 2020, 12:46 am


Society’s Cage SmithGroup

Society’s Cage is a timely interpretive installation born in the aftermath of the George Floyd and Breonna Taylor murders as our society reckons with institutional racism and white supremacy. The public installation features a bold interpretive pavilion sculpted to symbolize the historic forces of racialized state violence. 

The experience educates visitors and functions as a sanctuary to reflect, record and share personal thoughts. It is conceived in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement as a mechanism for building empathy and healing.

The initial installation coincides with the March on Washington in support of Black Lives, and is located on the National Mall at 12th Street and Madison Drive NW.  It is open to the public August 28 - September 12, 2020.

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Posted: September 4, 2020, 2:42 pm
A Virtual Museum Preserves Black Lives Matter Protest Art:

The university’s Urban Art Mapping George Floyd & Anti-Racist Street Art database is a publicly accessible digital catalog of street art around the world made in response to the past few months of Black Lives Matter protests. 

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Although it primarily features work from Minnesota, it has steadily expanded with every new submission. The project began out of a desire to preserve a wide range of art, from simple graffiti tags to commissioned murals, acknowledging locations, artist permissions, and the ever-evolving art in different neighborhoods. Since the project started in early June, it has received almost 1,000 submissions.

Posted: September 1, 2020, 4:31 pm


AP House Urbino GGA gardini gibertini architects

‘AP House’ bears witness to the rebirth of an ancient rural hamlet situated on the top of one of the highest hills in Urbino, highly esteemed for its landscape and environment. If the project with its architectural compositions and rigor, faithfully interprets the typical formal themes  of this Italian region (Marche), in its interiors, in the treatment of the materials, the design of the plant and its furnishings, it wants to vindicate its remarkable contemporaneity. 

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Posted: August 30, 2020, 5:16 pm


Collectives Cássio Campos Vasconcellos 

Collectives, is a series of aerial imageries by Brazilian photographer and artist Cássio Campos Vasconcellos, made from articulated photos captured during helicopter flights. 

On-going for almost 5 years, the project consists of large-format works portraying chaotic urban landscapes and exploring “jam-packed situations typical of our civilization”. Aiming to showcase the impact of human activity on the world, the collection of images is a visual investigation of our consumer society.

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Posted: August 28, 2020, 5:36 pm


Floating Pavilions and the Beauty of Temporary Art

Architecture is defined by its permanence. While the discipline’s most celebrated works are often those that were built to last, there’s inherent beauty and value in an architecture of impermanence.

Moving beyond conventional buildings and considering environmental and social impacts, temporary structures hold the potential to push the boundaries of architecture and the categorization of art.

The following pavilions were all made as floating structures. Questioning and reinterpreting traditional forms and construction, they were designed with diverse programs. Building connections with water, they show how contemporary architects and artists can create work that’s as beautiful as it is fleeting.

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Posted: August 27, 2020, 5:31 pm


Townscaper

Townscaper is not so much a game, as much as a surprisingly satisfying architectural diversion inviting “players” to build quaint island towns evocative of the wondrous worlds of a Studio Ghibli animation setting. 

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 The “game” invites users to build charming hamlets, erect enormous cathedrals, direct roads and canal networks, or even construct sky cities on stilts. The beauty of this game beyond the obvious creative possibilities it offers is its entry point for anyone and everyone. Townscaper is described as having “No goal. No real gameplay. Just plenty of building and plenty of beauty. That’s it.”

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Posted: August 24, 2020, 1:45 pm


“There is Power in Seeing the World from Above”: An Interview with Overview’s Benjamin Grant

Seeing from above – the aerial vantage point – is the illusion of knowledge. This was the idea of Frenchman Michel de Certeau, a historian who was interested in the everyday practices that occur on the ground, on the streetscape. In contrast to Certeau’s view, satellite images can be a powerful tool to understand, predict, and strive for a better future for humankind. This is the mission of Benjamin Grant, founder of Overview, a platform that explores human activity on Earth through aerial imagery.

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Posted: August 19, 2020, 2:11 pm


Imaginary Japanese Storefronts Come to Life in Charming Watercolor Scenes

When Polish animator Mateusz Urbanowicz moved to Tokyo in 2014, he began depicting some of his favorite storefronts in colorful watercolor illustrations. The artist has since continued his passion for cityscapes, but he’s taken the drawings in a different direction. Urbanowicz’s series New Storefronts depicts imaginary Japanese storefronts inspired by retro architecture styles.

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Posted: August 17, 2020, 12:56 pm


The Opus by Omniyat Illuminates Dubai’s Burj Kalifa District 

Conceived by Zaha Hadid in 2007, the Opus by Omniyat was completed posthumously by her firm Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) earlier this year, adding a welcome volumetric diversion to the rigid linearity of Dubai’s Burj Khalifa district. At just 305 feet high, the 20-story glass building is occupied by a ME Hotel and 96 residences, in addition to offices, restaurants, and bars. 

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With a cubelike form that dissolves at its core, the structure is divided into two towers that are connected by a four-story atrium at the base and a three-story bridge spanning the upper floors of one side. And while the outer walls of the Opus reflect the city and sky during the day, the amorphous void at its heart generates a dynamic glow that defines the building’s form when the sun sets.

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Posted: August 13, 2020, 4:44 pm


The Beauty of Construction Details: A Conversation with @the_donnies

Some projects have facades with such complex detailing, encompassing thousands and thousands of lines, hatches, and dimensions, that they inspire a particularly awestruck response. Making these drawings didactic, technical, and, above all, beautiful, is a task few can achieve to perfection. ArchDaily spoke with Troy Donovan, the creator of the 188,000 follower Instagram account @the_donnies, who does this job like few others.

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Posted: August 13, 2020, 3:30 pm

 

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