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Bringing Architecture, Design and Art to your Dash.



Home Library Architecture: Smart & Creative Bookcase Designs

Sharing your shelf is, in a way, sharing yourself. Every element —from the titles you choose to the way you organize them— says something about your personality and your interests. ArchDaily rounded up some of the finest examples of bookcases that combine practicality with ingenuity

Posted: July 1, 2020, 12:53 pm


Dreamy Candy-Colored Photos Capture the Magnificent Magic of Marrakech

French Polynesia-based travel photographer Helene Havard is known for her dreamy, pastel-hued images of locations that look like they’re straight out of a Wes Anderson film. From the streets of Havana to the candy-colored town of San Francisco, she captures the unique atmosphere of every place she visits, and her latest photo trip is no exception. She recently traveled to Marrakech, where she captured the mysterious magic of the exotic Moroccan city.

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“Despite the fact I was living in France for many years, I never had the chance to travel in Africa,” says Havard. “I waited to live on the other side of my native country to visit this amazing place during a trip in Europe.” From bustling street markets to palm tree-lined palaces and gardens, Havard explored the diverse streets of Marrakech “at random” to capture her photos. “Morocco is exotic, tantalizing and incredibly beautiful,” she recalls. “A feast for the senses and especially for the eyes. I loved this place for the mysterious feel that irradiates of her.”

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Posted: June 29, 2020, 5:35 pm


Hideout Horizon Bamboo House Studio WNA

Posted: June 9, 2020, 5:31 pm


Cathédrale du Sacré Coeur d'Alger

Posted: June 9, 2020, 5:27 pm


Posted: June 2, 2020, 3:05 pm


Playful Duo Captures the Fun and Joy of Interacting With Architecture 

Creative duo Daniel Rueda and Anna Devís find wonder in seemingly ordinary places. As two former architects, they incorporate elements of buildings into their whimsical compositions in which a model (often Devís) is perfectly coordinated with different facades or blends into the scenery.

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Posted: May 26, 2020, 1:42 pm
Colouring-In Movie Posters:

Colouring-in Movie Posters!

Jordan Bolton has made colouring-in versions of their Wes Anderson & Studio Ghibli object posters.

They are free to download at the link below for anyone to print off and colour-in at home.

Please share with anyone you think would be interested! 

https://drive.google.com/open?id=107hf9sfecHKjdsMX87gtSItYAWaoWsci

Facebook - Instagram - Twitter

Posted: May 21, 2020, 12:13 am


The Nickelodeon, Covehithe 2009 by James Alder

Posted: May 21, 2020, 12:09 am


Arata Isozaki’s Palladium Nightclub Through the Lens of Timothy Hursley

In May 1985, an old theater and concert hall opened its doors to the public for the opening of a brand new nightclub in New York City. Located on 126 East 14th Street, the project was commissioned by entrepreneurs Steve Rubell and Ian Schrager, owners of the also famous club Studio 54, and was conceived as a vibrant and luminous independent structure arranged inside a rather classic shell, which appears as a beautiful backdrop behind the clean geometry of Isozaki. 

PS I spent so many great nights at the Palladium in the late 80s/early 90s. These pics brought back those memories with a vengeance!

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Posted: May 20, 2020, 9:33 pm


Castles Across Europe, Reconstructed 

The built landscape of Europe has been sculpted by thousands of years of war and reconciliation. Kings and Queens, Vikings and Romans, Christians and Moors, all have built castles and forts with the strength of their workers’ hands. But over the centuries, many of these magnificent castles have fallen into ruin. Some were abandoned after suffering war damage, while others just fell out of use.

Here are some of the most unique ruined castles of Europe and, working with designers and architects, a series of architectural renders and reconstruction animations that bring them back to their former glory.

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Posted: April 30, 2020, 7:21 pm


Tape As Pandemic Architectural Element

In Singapore, tape is being used as a sort of architectural element to denote closure of public spaces and promote & enforce proper social distancing practices. The @tape_measures account on Instagram is documenting instances of this practice around the city.

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Posted: April 27, 2020, 1:09 am
Ten thoughts on the future of practice:

It’s too early to be making nuanced arguments about the future, as we face down what is undoubtedly going to be a much more serious situation in the second half of 2020. So, here are ten first thoughts about how our profession may be impacted, and potentially transformed, as a result. Choose two or three as prompts to consider the future once the crisis has passed. 

 1. Economics: While there are mixed reports of how hard a recession might hit the industry, it’s already clear that certain building types, particularly retail and commercial office, will fall off the profession’s radar for several years while overall the AEC sector contracts across the board. Another wave of fierce fee competition, as surviving firms fight for contracts, will ensue. Can some firms fight above the fray?

2. Demographics: If the downturn lasts more than a year, another “lost generation” of students, taking their considerable design and thinking talents into an environment that values “design thinking,” will leave the profession never to return. If the 2008 recession eliminated some of the older Baby Boomers who were unable to grasp technology and keep their firms alive, the last of the Boomers may find themselves with the same fate. But with retirement portfolios largely destroyed, will there be hangers-on?

3. Jobs: New jobs, not many. Firms will trim their excesses and dead weight, and may do some strategic replacement, meaning when the upturn comes there’s a shortage of talent, as firms don’t have the reserves to keep staff despite the very high costs of replacement. Will the talent be there to be hired? Remote work may be a desirable option to improve work-life balance.

4. Technology: The last recession saw the profession’s transition from CAD to BIM. Eleven years later there is a much larger array of tools available: big data, analytics, reality capture, computational design, machine learning (to name a few) and lots of “BuildTech” development. Some practices will embrace these tools to redefine their capabilities; others, like many in 2008, will use new technologies (like BIM) toward very old ends (making better drawings).

5. Practice methods: As the entirety of practice has demonstrated an ability to work digitally and remotely, talent networks for firms will widen beyond locale, and intensified data-based processes and deliverable will (for firms willing to experiment further) open opportunities to create new value through digital service like analytics, digital fabrication, and augmented reality/experience.

6. Practice structure: Most practices moved their work seamlessly out of the office and to their respective homes, showing that a physical office may not be essential to running a firm. A new generation of younger, digitally-facile practices, with workers and talent distributed globally, will emerge to compete with traditional incumbents. They’ll be lithe, flexible, less subject to economic dynamics, and won’t know each other as well. The design version of the “gig” economy may emerge, focused less on full projects, and more on discrete tasks.

7. Construction: Between health concerns, immigration, supply stream instability and pricing pressures, builders will turn strongly to automation on the site and prefabrication off it. The necessary tools and processes require digital infrastructure unsuited to traditional drawing and builders will find it, either from their architects or elsewhere. Government funding of projects may drive digital protocols as a requirement, and the industry would be forced toward standards, finally, as a result.

8. Talent: “Survival of the fittest” suggests that some of the best firms of this decade will emerge from the crucible of the crisis, and today’s students will watch carefully from the academic sidelines, preparing themselves for the new realities of the recovery and demanding from their educators what they think is important to prepare them for the workplace. The survivors will define that talent agenda, which is likely to be a heady mix of technological prowess, ability to collaborate directly and remotely, and flexible work style and technique.

9. Space: Some of the ineffable priorities of design will give way to more epidemiological considerations: how does this space perform in a pandemic? Are occupants more or less healthy? Can it be cleaned? Can it perform, technically, spatially, and aesthetically under new rules of interaction and social distance?

10. The City: Cities have been hardest by COVID-19, calling into question the challenges of proximity and density. If social distancing and “home stay” are regular strategies to manage pandemic, the changing nature of urban space—and the potential revival of the more spacious suburbs—are opportunities for architects to rethink and redefine fundamentals of living.

There’s little doubt the post-COVID-19 world will look different—politically, economically and architecturally—than it looked in February. The duration and depth of the downturn will determine the potency of the ideas suggested above. Firm leaders are best prepared when they spend some of their current efforts managing through turbulent times toward that future, whatever it might be.

Posted: April 24, 2020, 4:49 pm


Musée Atelier Audemars Piguet

Musée Atelier Audemars Piguet is a spiral-shaped building rising up out of the landscape of Vallée de Joux in Switzerland designed by BIG for the watchmaker to house its collection of timepieces.

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The curved glass walls and the green roof of the BIG-designed pavilion sit next to the original Audemars Piguet workshop, which was set up in 1875.

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This historic building has been restored by Swiss architecture office CCHE and connected to the new museum, which was also realised by the studio.

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Posted: April 22, 2020, 6:22 pm


Onagawan Hinterland, Japan 2016 by James Alder

Posted: April 15, 2020, 12:39 pm


London Lowline: Gates to different Worlds, Competition Entry by Gkoliomyti Anastasia and Panayotis Varoutsos

Posted: April 15, 2020, 12:39 pm
How architecture is exacerbating the coronavirus crisis for minorities and Black Americans:

“COVID-19 has been a magnifying glass on the weaknesses in our systems,” said Kimberly Dowdell, principal at HOK and president of the National Organization for Minority Architects (NOMA). Though racialized housing disparities are nothing new, the stark death toll of the pandemic is harshly illustrating those disparities’ effects.

Posted: April 14, 2020, 7:24 pm


Вадим Соловьёв

Posted: April 13, 2020, 6:14 pm


Can You Identify These 12 Iconic Buildings Solely From Their Sections?

This particular form of architectural representation is hard to beat when it comes to understanding a building through visual means: Concepts relating to formal qualities, spatial rationale and programmatic principles can all be displayed with great clarity with the aid of a detailed slice through a structure.

Follow the source link to find out how many buildings can you identify from a single section!

Posted: April 13, 2020, 6:09 pm


Stairway House nendo 

A two-family home in a quiet residential area of Tokyo. With other houses and apartment buildings pressing around the site, the architectural volume was pushed to the north to take in daylight, ventilation, and greenery of the yard into the living environment by a large glass front southern façade.

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The layout plan made it possible to preserve the existing persimmon tree beloved by the previous generations. Considering the potential difficulties of going up and down the stairs, the rooms for the older couple were arranged on the 1st floor. The eight cats living with the older couple roam in and outdoors more freely, and encourages the mother to enjoy her hobby of gardening more freely.

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The younger couple and their child reside on the 2nd and 3rd floors. To avoid the two households being completely separated at the top and bottom, a “stairway-like” structure was designed in the south yard, continuing upward into the building and penetrating the 1st through 3rd floors.

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Posted: April 7, 2020, 7:12 pm

 

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